A letter can always get you through hard times . . . not to mention a few A-list stars

Category: P.S. I Love You News | Posted by: admin
Article Date: October 10, 2006 | Publication: Irish Independent | Author: Shane Hickey
Publication/Article Link:http://www.unison.ie/entertainment" target="_blank" class="ng_url"> http://www.unison.ie/entertainment

THERE was once a tradition in public life where a newly appointed politician would be given two letters by his predecessor to be opened in an emergency.

When the proverbial hit the fan, the new statesman would open the first letter which said, "blame your predecessor". After the second crisis, the next letter to be opened read, "sit down and write two letters".

It's safe to say that Bertie Ahern will not be thinking about writing letters to his successor should the storm that has developed over recent weeks turn fatal.

Better, then, to stick to the letters closer to home, those his daughter Cecilia knows well. Taking the short trip around the corner from Leinster House yesterday morning, Bertie pressed the flesh with the height of Hollywood glitterati, who were shooting the upcoming film version of 'PS I Love You', Cecilia's best-selling novel.

In Whelan's of Camden Street, where the shooting took place, the twice-taoiseach met the twice-Oscar winner Hilary Swank, who plays widow Holly in the film, as well as Gerard Butler, who plays her husband Gerry. Before he dies, Gerry writes Holly a series of letters to be opened after his death. The cast and crew are here for 10 days before they head off to New York to shoot the remainder of the film.

Bertie spent almost half an hour in the city centre bar, where a music scene of 'Galway Girl' was being filmed. Said to be in "great form", he chatted to director Richard LaGravenese, as well as producer Molly Smith before heading off to Germany on EU business.
Former 'Friends' star Lisa Kudrow missed her golden opportunity to meet the Taoiseach as she was on a day off. Meanwhile, the Irish Film Board is celebrating the making of the movie on home soil by opening its first overseas office in Los Angeles.

Dubbed the Irish Film Commission US, Jonathan Loughran said the office would promote Ireland as a location for US feature films and television dramas, such as 'The Tudors', a major television series shot here this year.