300 the movie (Blog)

Category: 300 News | Posted by: admin
Article Date: January 18, 2007 | Publication: Five Point Someone | Author: subhash veeravalli
Publication/Article Link:http://fivepointsome1.blogspot.com/2007/01/300-movie.html

About the movie :-

Action/Adventure, Drama, Adaptation and War
Basic line :- Set in the midst of the Persian-Greco war during the Battle of Thermopylae, where Spartan king Leonidas led his army of 300 soldiers into battle against the invading Persian army. According to legend, their valor and sacrifice inspired all of Greece to unite against their Persian foe, leading to the origins of democracy.

Releasing :-

March 9th, 2007 (wide)

MPAA Rating: R for graphic battle sequences throughout, some sexuality and nudity.
Starring

Gerard Butler, Lena Headey, Dominic West, David Wenham

Director

Zack Snyder

Produced by:
Frank Miller, Deborah Snyder, Craig J. Flores

OFFICIAL WEBSITE : http://300themovie.warnerbros.com/

Trailer links : http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1809262865/trailer

Based on a Novel By franklin miller.Trailers are already available on 300 official website.

Nice Music scores and slow motion's highly graphical battle scenes causing a fantasy in the viewers.Most of the peoples expecting it to be a Movie having a higher range than Lord of the Rings.May be the story might be a hit or not,But the movie will be a treat for the viewers viewing in the theaters with nice music scores and sexy backgrounds.
The trailors dialogues and making is also very good.especially the dialect's like "Madness,This is sparta" and 300 spartans fightiing against a million.More over viewers are havig high expectations on this movie.Lets stay tuned to enjoy it on the screen.

Here by im posting a post from a forum where a discussion was going on whats the numbers of enemies in the battle

Regarding numbers involved, estimates of the Persian host vary in the ancient histories and modern estimates from 1 million all the way down to 250,000. This number is accepted by historians as the minimum based on studies of Persian military structure, and the available water sources along the invasion route. 400,000 at most is generally the number cited.

As for the Spartans - there were only 300. They only sent that many because it was during the Feast of Apollo - and by tradition the Spartan army did not leave their territory until the festival was finished. They only broke from this tradition due to the urgency of the situation. King Leonidas specifically chose men who had sons old enough to take charge of family affairs. They were joined at the narrow pass at Thermopylae by somewhere between 5-7,000 other Greeks from various city states.

They chose this pass specifically because it was a choke point, and would not allow the Persians to bring their full force to bear - evening the odds so to speak.

1,000 Phocians were posted in the heights to block a path that led to the rear of the Spartan position - unfortunately, they were surprised at dawn of the third day by the elite "Immortals" (led by the Greek traitor Ephialtes), still hurting from the total ass-kicking they had taken from the Spartans on the previous day.

Once they realized that they had been betrayed, a council of war was held and Leonidas sent the other units away. 700 Thespians stayed with the Spartans to hold the pass in the final Persian assault. And there they died, to the last man - fulfilling the oracle that foretold the death of a Spartan king would be required to save Sparta. Archeological digs have confirmed that the last group died on a small hill under a rain of arrows.

Xerxes was angry at the loss of so many of his soldiers, and had the head of Leonidas cut off and the body crucified.

Some of my favorite Spartan quotes passed down to us by Greek historians:

Leonidas to his wife Gorgo, upon being asked what she should do after he left for Thermopylae:
Marry a good man, and have good children.

Leonidas to Xerxes, upon first being asked to surrender Spartan arms:
Come and take them.

Dienekes, a Spartan soldier on hearing that Persian arrows were so thick in battle that they blotted out the sun:
So much the better, we shall fight in the shade