NIM'S Island is a family fantasy adventure that delivers what it promises.

Category: Nim's Island Reviews | Posted by: stagewomanjen
Article Date: April 7, 2008 | Publication: Sunday Mail | Author: Chris Bartlett
Publication/Article Link:http://guides.news.com.au/couriermail/movies/movie/?title_id=35301&review=60764

NIM'S Island is a family fantasy adventure that delivers what it promises.


Easy on the eye, it's a pleasant, uplifting, entertaining tale of how two stranded souls can overcome the tyranny of distance to find each other and help each other through hard times.


There's also an unsubtle anti-development theme running through the film, which can be forgiven as it actually adds to the fun. Based on Wendy Orr's popular novel, it tells the story of young Nim (Abigail Breslin), who lives on a perfect, deserted tropical island (swaying palms, plentiful food, fish and even superfast broadband) with her widower father (Gerard Butler), a marine scientist now devoted to his work and his daughter.


Denied other human contact, the incredibly well-adjusted Nim occupies her time with a menagerie of friends a seal, pelican and lizard and her favourite reading material, a series of adventure books featuring the Indiana Jones-like Alex Rover.


As Nim reads, the story comes to life around her (with Butler reverting to his Scots accent playing Rover). When Dad takes the boat and heads off on a two-night work trip, Nim is left alone on the island.


But a storm suddenly blows up and father and daughter are pitched into struggles for their future.


Dad is stranded at sea, daughter is stranded on the island. And the sharks are circling both. Literally for him, while Nim tries to shoo off a predatory cruise ship captain (Michael Carman) and his ghastly passengers.


Desperate, Nim emails Alex Rover. And Alex Rover answers. Only it's not the Alex Rover Nim imagines, it's an agoraphobic San Francisco writer, played with some comic aplomb by Jodie Foster. With her conscience (Butler again, with fedora, leather jacket and whip) nagging her, Foster/Rover heads to the South Seas to help the little girl.


While there are few surprises, this is ideal school holiday fodder a little slice of quiet cinematic paradise.