Crude Romantic Comedy can't hide its old fashioned appeal

Category: The Ugly Truth Reviews | Posted by: admin
Article Date: July 26, 2009 | Publication: the217.com | Author: Syd Slobodnik
Publication/Article Link:the217.com

It’s amazing how a modern, crude romantic sex comedy shows its really traditional, old fashioned, qualities. Not much has changed since yesteryear’s Tracy/Hepburn Adam’s Rib or Doris Day/Rock Hudson Pillow Talk, except for some obvious explicit words. In director Robert Luketic’s latest film, The Ugly Truth a pair of complete polar opposites collide, reluctantly attract, and fall for each other. And while admittedly predictable, there is a strange appeal to the simple entertainment value of these rom-coms.

Grey’s Anatomy’s Katherine Heigl stars as a high powered television producer, who’s having ratings troubles with her morning news program when her executives hire a crude local cable television host of a male oriented advice show called “The Ugly Truth” to spice up the morning news. Within days, there are morning features on the sex lives of chimpanzees, bimbos wrestling in pools of gelatin, and the show’s husband and wife anchors are revealing their sexual frustrations.

Heigl’s Abby is a cute, but lonely professional with particular issues with almost every man she sees. Predictably, she’s looking for the ideal, sensitive guy who’ll respect her. Mike, the new host commentator, with his modern cave man’s philosophy, likes his women cheap and horizontal. Gerard Butler’s Mike has an edgy, almost young Mel Gibson charm about him. And oddly, Heigl and Butler have a somewhat charming on screen chemistry. When Abby finds this ideal man, who coincidentally happens to be a handsome doctor and her new neighbor, Mike offers to coach Abby on how to act more appealing to men. Why she ever accepted this advice is inexplicable, but when the advice works, Mike gets noticeably jealous.

While the film’s minimal plot offers a variety of low brow laughs, the ugly truth about this tale is that it's actually about the old fashioned sincerity that attracts men and women. The Ugly Truth never tries to take itself too seriously or pretend profoundness, it simply entertains.